About Antonio Vivaldi

Antonio Lucio Vivaldi (1678-1741)

Born in 1678, Antonio Lucio Vivaldi is closely associated with his native city of Venice. He studied music as a child with his father, a violinist. At the age of 15, he began to study for the priesthood, and was ordained as a Roman Catholic priest in 1703.

Antonio Vivaldi (Composer) Born: March 4, 1678 - Venice, Italy Died: July 27/28, 1741 - Vienna, Austria Antonio Lucio Vivaldi, nicknamed il Prete Rosso ('The Red Priest'), was a Venetian priest and Baroque music composer, as well as a famous virtuoso violinist; he was born and raised in the Republic of Venice.

  • The creator of hundreds of spirited, extroverted instrumental works, Italian composer Antonio Vivaldi is widely recognized as the master of the Baroque instrumental concerto, which he perfected and popularized more than any of his contemporaries.
  • Oct 21, 2020 Venetian musician, Antonio Vivaldiwas one of the most fertile and original composers of the eighteenth century, especially in the field of instrumental music, so much so that he enjoyed the admiration of Johann Sebastian Bach.
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  • Let me show you Facts about Antonio Vivaldi if you want to know the Italian Baroque teacher, virtuoso violinist, composer and cleric. He was born on 4 March 1678 in Venice with the full name Antonio Lucio Vivaldi. He was passed away on 28 July 1741.

Facts About Antonio Vivaldi

About Antonio Vivaldi

Vivaldi spent most of his career at a single institution – the Ospedale della Pietà, a home for the illegitimate children of Venetian noblemen and courtiers. Starting as a teacher in 1703, Vivaldi had as his pupils the girls at the Ospedale, for whom music was a key part of their curriculum. Vivaldi was tasked with composing new works for every major church feast, as well as teaching music and voice, and instructing the girls to play various instruments. He proved himself to be indispensable to the school, and was given the position of maestro di concerti in 1716. Under his tenure, the Ospedale’s choir and orchestra built a strong reputation.

About Antonio Vivaldi Life

Vivaldi wrote over 500 instrumental concertos and sacred choral works. He also composed some 40 operas, not for the school, but for public performance in Venice. Although Vivaldi remained with the Ospedale through virtually his entire life, his music became known throughout Europe. Vivaldi’s influence may have helped to lighten the darker aspects of the northern European baroque by infusing it with a joyful, Mediterranean tone.

In 1740, Vivaldi moved to Vienna. It is thought that he may have hoped to gain a position with the Austrian court, but seems to have found no success. He died in Vienna as a pauper in 1741. In a curious coincidence that illustrates the intertwined relationships throughout the baroque world, a young Franz Joseph Hayden was at this time a choir boy at St. Stephen’s Cathedral, where Vivaldi’s funeral was conducted.

At the time of his death, Vivaldi’s music was already falling out of favor and few of his compositions were available. He would be virtually ignored until after 1926, when a large cache of original manuscripts was discovered (including his now-beloved Four Seasons). Forgotten works by Vivaldi continue to appear from time to time, most recently in 2003 and 2005.

Artist Biography by Rovi Staff

Facts About Antonio Vivaldi

The creator of hundreds of spirited, extroverted instrumental works, Italian composer Antonio Vivaldi is widely recognized as the master of the Baroque instrumental concerto, which he perfected and popularized more than any of his contemporaries. Vivaldi's kinetic rhythms, fluid melodies, bright instrumental effects, and extensions of instrumental technique make his some of the most enjoyable of Baroque music. He was highly influential among his contemporaries and successors: even as esteemed a figure as Johann Sebastian Bach adapted some of Vivaldi's music. Vivaldi's variable textures and dramatic effects initiated the shift toward what became the Classical style; a deeper understanding of his music begins with the realization that, compared with Bach and even Handel, he was Baroque music's arch progressive. Though not as familiar as his concerti, Vivaldi's stage and choral music is still of value; his sometimes bouncy, sometimes lyrical Gloria in D major (1708) has remained a perennial favorite. His operas were widely performed in his own time.

Facts About Antonio Vivaldi

About Antonio Vivaldi

Details regarding Vivaldi's early life are few. His father was a violinist in the Cathedral of Venice's orchestra and probably Antonio's first teacher. There is much speculation about other teachers, such as Corelli, but no evidence to support this. Vivaldi studied for the priesthood as a young man and was ordained in 1703. He was known for much of his career as 'il prete rosso' (the red-haired priest), but soon after his ordination he declined to take on his ecclesiastical duties. Later in life he cited ill health as the reason, but other motivations have been proposed; perhaps Vivaldi simply wanted to explore new opportunities as a composer. It didn't take him long. Landing a job as a violin teacher at a girls' orphanage in Venice (where he would work in one capacity or another during several stretches of his life), he published a set of trio sonatas and another of violin sonatas. Word of his abilities spread throughout Europe, and in 1711 an Amsterdam publisher released a set of Vivaldi's concertos for one or more violins with orchestra under the title L'estro armonico (Harmonic Inspiration). These were best-sellers (it was this group of concertos that spurred Bach's transcriptions), and Vivaldi followed them up with several more equally successful concerto sets. Perhaps the most prolific of all the great European composers, he once boasted that he could compose a concerto faster than a copyist could ready the individual parts for the players in the orchestra. He began to compose operas, worked from 1718 to 1720 in the court of the German principality of Hessen-Darmstadt, and traveled in Austria and perhaps Bohemia. Throughout his career, he had his choice of commissions from nobility and the highest members of society, the ability to use the best performers, and enough business savvy to try to control the publication of his works, although due to his popularity, many were published without his consent. Later in life Vivaldi was plagued by rumors of a sexual liaison with one of his vocal students, and he was censured by ecclesiastical authorities. His Italian career on the rocks, he headed for Vienna. He died there and was buried as a pauper in 1741, although at the height of his career his publications had earned him a comfortable living.